Drucken | PDF | 
Kommentare [10]
13. November 2008

Excerpts from "CONTRE L'ART GLOBAL, pour un art sans identité"

Jean-Claude Moineau
Translation: Michel Chevalier

Bei den folgenden zwei Auszügen aus Jean-Claude Moineaus Buch handelt es sich um das erste und vorletzte von insgesamt 14 Kapiteln. Sie bilden gewissermaßen die Klammer des im Titel des Buches programmatisch anklingenden, konfronta-
tiven kunsttheoretischen Einsatzes. Die derzeit um sich greifende „globale Kunst“ ist nach Moineau vor allem durch ihre Eigenschaft, zur allgemeinen Konfusion beizutragen, gekennzeichnet. Moineaus Konzept einer mikrokünstlerischen Kunst, ist durch ihre nicht identitäre Bestimmbarkeit bestimmbar. Sie ist nicht minimal, aber ein Minimum an Kunst.
Was durch die hier vorgenommene Auswahl der Texte an Denkschritten verloren geht, kann nur stichwortartig durch die Titel weiterer Kapitel angedeutet werden: „L'artiste et ses ’modèles’, „À compte d'auteur", „Pour un catalogue critique des arts réputés illègitimes". Noch ein Hinweis: Die sprachliche Machart der einzelnen Kapitel wechselt vom theoretisch-reflexiven zum literarischen Text oder manifest-
artigen Gedicht.
What follows are the first and last chapters from Jean-Claude Moineau's most recently published book. They bracket, in a way, his art-theoretical, confrontationally and programmmatically titled approach. According to Moineau, this ever-expanding global art is marked by its tendency to further general confusion. His concept of micro-artistic art is defined by its non-identifiability/
identatrianism. It is not minimal; instead: a minimum of art.
That part of the argument one loses in translating only two chapters (of 14) can perhaps be at least suggested, elliptically, through the titles of a few others: "the artist and his 'models'", "insofar as one is an author", "for a critical catalogue of those arts said to be illegitimate". Another tip: chapters vary considerably in the discursive mode Moineau employs: the reflexive-theoretical yields to the literary, then to the manifesto-esque poetic.



From Total Art to Global Art
(note: JCM uses "global" and "globalization" in the original French, as opposed to the more standard "mondialisation." The selected noun carries an English ring, indicating the cultural as well as economic dimensions of "free-trade" extension, whereas the adjective, in addition, implies ubiquity without clear delimitation. —MC)

If total art—already in gestation with the panoptic gaze of the panorama, from the Wagnerian phantasmagoria to the impudent "everything is art" of the avant-gardes— was in phase with the oh-so ambiguous notion of totalitarianism, after the "dictatorship of the media" (in conjunction with mass culture more than with art per se) allowed an "economy", stricto sensu, of any totalitarianism, global art, for its part, in conjunction with liberalism, has adopted this role for post-totalitarian (A) market democracy, which the West thinks it can export to the entire world... along with that new oxymoron: conservative revolution.

Global art is less an integral art than than an art integrally integrated that—after the failure of whatever critical pretension postmodernism may have had, and the observation that any critical aim inexorably becomes absorbed by precisely that which it is trying to critique—has abandoned any critical dimension that would imply an elsewhere, unrelentingly making the charge that any critical ambition can only be reactive.

At the most, being confined to the role of cultural content, of entertainment, becoming diluted into spectacle (but one which is not so much cut off from life as it spectacularizes life itself), global art, like total art before it, would like to illusorily re-enchant a disenchanted world, a world that the current globalization—of which it is a constitutive part, if one can venture to cut it into different parts—disenchants ever more and more, however. And this although global art, having nevertheless given up all exteriority, is an art that has definitely given up any transcendence, more so even than modernist art. it seeks the source of enchantment at the heart of this world, and not elsewhere or outside, complacently settled in the most extreme superficiality.

Following up on totalitarian regimes' great hysterical drum-beat marches, global art has become the art of fashion catwalk shows in institutional art centers, to the club-mixes of "wild" (or just looking it) DJs. Global art tends to blend into the look. Whereas total art (in an avant-gardist way, running against the grain of modernism) tried to fuse art and life, be it social or biological (B), global art is the art of generalized confusion. Confusion of art and non-art, of art and fashion, of art and money, of art and culture, confusion of the various arts and the cultures... a confusion which overlaps working-time and leisure-hours.

Global art is an art not so much aimed at an audience as it is aimed at both a market undergoing globalization and institutions, be they national or multinational. It is the most institutional art that could be, a hyper-institutional art that has turned its back on critique, be it of institutions or of art. The art of congregations and carnivals, big international trade fairs and farts.

The globalization of art is, for the first time, the concrete world-wide extension (mondialisation) of the world of art, its extension, if not to all social strata or societies (far from it!), at least to all areas of our planet in its entirety.

Unlike artistic currents antecedent to it, postmodernism included, that only covered a relatively limited area of the planet (even though, as Pascale Casanova has shown (C), naturalism was the first artistic current extending to territories previously beyond the reach of the art world, at the margins of the art world), the "contemporary art" category is the first that is a truly global one. Whereas art had always tried to extend its borders, whereas total art—seeking a synthesis of arts in opposition to modernist art—had tried to overcome the borders between media and arts, whereas sixties art had become an art without media specificity, a "generic art," global art dispenses with the old borders separating media and art, as with geopolitical borders, while still not quite being able to ignore them completely, being concentrated as it is in a few super-protected locations. These places see regular get-togethers of global artworld actors who transhume from here and there in impressive concert, like a chirping flock of migratory birds. Flux, both material and virtual, of works, of capital, of people. The artworld mutates into the art network, both market and institutional, tightly interconnected, really only one and the same. Art and culture tightly intermingling.

Thus the global artist is one who, inverting usual schema, is first recognized globally, then locally (Duchamp set this precedent: refused by the 1912 Paris Salon des Indépendants, he was acclaimed at the first international exhibition of "modern" art, the 1913 Armory Show. Yet he managed, in a counter-move, to utterly contrive his exclusion—under a false name—from the New York Independents show of 1917). A mobile artist, less the traveling painter or photographer of yore than a jet-artist mostly living in a country other that where he or she was born, in one of the global art citadels. That is, if he or she is even a resident of one location since, unlike the artists of the early twentieth century who lived in exile, the global artist must now plough across the entire planet non-stop. Just as the global art curator is one who pursues an international career leading to a succession of jobs in high-places of global art, and is in motion perpetually, flexibilité oblige, in a world which is itself in constant motion, more than ever without a fixed point of reference. So it's always the same ones who divvy up the jobs, with a very strong homogenization effect on the "art world."

And whereas totalitarian art was one in which the political Commissar played at being a curator (commissaire) ès arts, global art (always this issue of flexibility) sees (global) artists playing at being curators and the (global) curator play at being an artist, with exhibition qua artwork (reducing the works exhibited to mere material in the hands of the curator-artist) and qua medium (be it "impure," or even "theatrical" via that ever-more-invasive exhibition scenography). On top of that, both can play at being art critics in an artworld where, precisely, lacking the critical distance and necessary independence (3), any real critique, be it artistic criticism or critical art, is excluded. Just as total art made everything art, which meant nothing was art, in global art everyone is a mediator, so no mediation is possible anymore (even if it is the case that the critic must confine his/herself to the simple role of mediator, which tends to empty critique of its critical character).

And whereas total art delved into all media at once, the global artist hereafter considers him/herself to be a medium, a self-medium (D)(which leads to a sort of rehabilitation of the author, even if it doesn't quite retrieve its former prerogatives), or becomes a post-media artist (without necessarily becoming a cyber-artist), obviously using the brave-new-language that Anglo-American has become (to the detriment not so much of the conservation of other languages, but rather of their becoming, including their "becoming minor"), using numeric code. The global artist delves less in all media as he/she delves into all cultures at once, drawing out of—or pillaging, like a hacker, even though pillage can be either celebrated or met with opprobium—the hypermarket of world cultures. Global art is an art of the planetary mix that occludes historic power-relations—more so than production relations—in which art and culture find their perpetuation, within an increasing indifferentiation of art and culture.

An art of the fragment and of the montage of fragments had historically stood in opposition, with some success, to total art and totalitarianism of the spirit. Yet today, consideration of local dimensions, despite all the inital enthusiasm this approach first gathered, has shown itself incapable of really standing up to the global dimension, or even of resisting it. The local is itself globalized, "glocalised." Globalization is both delocalization and relocalization, secreting not only various differences, more or less indifferent, but also new inequalities, as local as they are translocal, and quite real. The tide of identitarianism, in art as elsewhere, and "multiculturalism," far from being opposed to globalization, have only contributed to it in their own way, on their own scales (that which Slavoj Zizek designates with yet another oxymoron, that of "multicultural liberalism") (E). A globalization that is far from answering the unanimous hopes that followed the end of the cold war and the division of the world into two blocs, "bloc against bloc." Instead of heralding a perpetual peace, it left us with perpetual war, a fractalized war covering the whole planet where "new frontiers" crop up incessantly. War—and it's not just an image-war—to which the image-war fully contributes in its own way insofar as it contributes, in great part, to making the news, making the event.

("CONTRE L'ART GLOBAL, pour un art sans identité", pp. 3-7)

(A) See Jean-Pierre LE GOFF, La Démocratie post-totalitaire, (Paris, La découverte, 2002).
(B) This was successfully carried off in a way by totalitarian art, be it Hitlerian or Stalinist, see Boris GROYS, Staline œuvre d’art totale, 1988, French translation (Nîmes: Jacqueline Chambon, 1990).
(C)Pascale CASANOVA, La République mondiale des lettres, (Paris: Seuil, 1999).
(D)See Jean CLOUTIER, La Communication audio-scripto-visuelle à l’heure des self-média ou l’ère d’Emerec, (Montréal: Presses de l’Université de Montréal, 1973), Pascal BEAUSSE, Informations, enquêtes sur le réel et self-médias, in Paul ARDENNE, Pascal BEAUSSE & Laurent GOUMARRE, Pratiques contemporaines, L’Art comme expérience, (Paris: Dis Voir, 1999) and Wang Du magazine, Vol.1, Je veux être un média, (Paris: Design mental, 2001).
(E) Slavoj ZIZEK, Plaidoyer en faveur de l’intolérance, French translation (Paris: Climats, 2004).



For a Micro-artistic Art

Oddly, there is a certain return to political art today, although this may just be simple nostalgia or, yet again, simple phantasm.

A return that one could view in tandem with a certain renewal of political thought, political philosophy, after years of deficit, ice-age, and this despite—or one could say precisely because of—our current globalization. A globalization that is not only economic or political but was, at its very outset, all-encompassing, including an art which is itself being globalized (although art is not necessarily following economic, political, and social transformations in goose-step).

A return, then, to political art, after the historical failure of our last century's attempts at political art, at politicization of art, if not an aesthetization (or "artistisation") of the political—which totalitarian regimes succeeded all too well at, to take up the Bejaminian distinction, extending totalitarian art to all of life. (1)

And this despite the fact that after its so-called failure, art—somewhat chastened—seems more depoliticized than ever. And that the rare attempts at political art, despite everything, prove to be quite disappointing, both artistically and politically: more a trivial form of spectacle, and thereby in tune with the "politics of art." On this point we can indeed voice agreement with Dominique Baqué's book, For a new political art. (2) Without in any way, however, sharing its assumptions on perspectives it aims to open with regard to what it calls the relay of political art to the document and the documentary (which he fails to distinguish, and even confounds with social documentary on top of that, thereby running against all studies devoted to the subject). An assumption that merely legitimates that which is, yet again, only a "documentary form" (in a sense that is not necessarily Walker Evans') art has been able to "make use of" these last few years in several very official, very institutional, (global) art contexts. A trend which seeks to offset a definite crisis, or at least exhaustion, of global art and exhibition. And this despite the fact that document-as-an-end-in-itself, set in opposition to art by the early twentieth century avant-gardes, has itself run into a sort of crisis, despite what its heralds say.

And it is also difficult for us to share Baqué's all-too-quick dismissal, among those recent attempts at political art, of that unfortunately-named "art of the intimate" (which had never, by the way, sported the "political art label"—if there could be any such label). He takes up the most hackneyed critical line, referring to its individualist and egocentric nature, reflecting the downfall of the political in an era of crumbling values, in which—following Gilles Lipovetsky's work—all have left are individual values. (3) If one can be highly skeptical of a so-called art-of-the-intimate, which would encapsulate works in a more or less confused (and more confused than less) way, this term is nonetheless the echo, or a symptom, of an important demand inspired by (so-called "third generation") feminism bearing on questions relating to the distinction between public and private spheres, at least insofar as it functions in liberal patriarchal society: the demand for intimacy within the private sphere itself, traditionally considered feminine, although it is constantly subjugated to a full-throttle masculine domination.

One simply couldn't, in our present day and age, hold on—or go back— to yesterday's avant-garde concepts, to the intention of solving the art/politics contradiction, no more than to the modernist concept of art's autonomy with regard to the political. The use of the term "autonomy" in political discourse since the '60s only adds confusion in this regard. Autonomy can be declined with regard to a variety of entities, and that which is autonomous from one entity can be heteronomous towards another, and vice-versa. There is never any autonomy without heteronomy, but a mix of the two.
Avant-garde art itself, insofar as it sought to be mainly heteronomous, nevertheless sought autonomy from artistic institutions with regard to which (mostly autonomous) modernist art was, obviously, heteronomous. But this demand for autonomy from artistic institutions could hardly be taken up in the same manner today: so-called "alternative" institutions, apparently autonomous from the institution of art, fail to be so completely, and often merely extend the institution beyond the institution.
No more could one could maintain a clear distinction, an "autonomy," between different entities, least of all between art and politics. One could deconstruct the distinctions between various political and artistic instances (even if deconstruction never means destruction), the different entities still remain separate, both autonomous and heteronomous.

But this also raises the much-harped-on issue of art which not only seeks to be political with regard to artistic institutions, but also with regard to political apparatuses. Political art, one assumes (and political apparatuses especially like to assume this) could not act in an isolated way, it could not be solely the product of artists. But then we shouldn't limit ourselves to reproducing existing schemas that have all failed. One could simply consider the relation political art could have to new forms of political (or micro-political) organization, themselves less hierarchical, less centralized than in the past and that have also adopted the network paradigm, as has the society they are attempting to resist. And these forms are in fact networked with that society they are attempting to resist.

"An art that wants to be political"? But one could precisely fault a political art project for its intentionality (against the grain of the contemporary critique of intentionality), as was done in the case of Satrean (4) art engagé (although Sartre, maintaining a "modern-style" distinction between media, rejected the idea of engagé art, favoring instead engagé literature, perhaps an engagé cinema riding on the latter's coattails). It would still be appropriate to distinguish between political and engagé art, even if this distinction could itself be deconstructed (although not destroyed).

Just as, at the other end of the spectrum, one should distinguish between political art and critical art. The latter is not necessarily intentional, and is also on the wane after the defeat of those approaches that "sought" to be critical within postmodernism, as if postmodernism had fallen prey to its fascination with those simulacra it sought to criticize. Pierre Lévy (5), wrapping himself up in Deleuze quotes, even purports to theorize the impossibility of any criticism, the reactive character of any criticism. Still, one should maintain the demand for critical awareness, even if this has become ever more difficult due to the current globalization, which excludes any exteriority or effort at distancing, and thereby excludes all critique. But we should, just the same, avoid falling back into a Lukacs-style "critical realism" the way Allan Sekula does (6), when he contradictorily mixes it with an F.S.A.-ish social documentary revival (and the latter should especially not be confounded with the "documentary style" of Walker Evans).

Luc Boltanski and Eve Chiapello (7) show that the "artist critique" of society, be it within or without critical art, is prone to being coopted by reigning social forces—in the service of maintenance and adaption for their self-perpetuation—when this critique is not linked to a "social critique" of society.
An art claiming to be political cannot obstinately set out to accompany (and even support) capitalism's current economic transformations, irregardless of the words used to describe this process: new spirit of capitalism, cognitive capitalism...

And if there has been a timid renewal of political art in the past few years, what has really happened can be more aptly described as a return of ethics, if not of an old-fashioned moralism seeking to censor once an again an art where anything is hence allowed. Even if, as Lipovetsky notes (8), the ethics that are seeing a comeback are "washed-out," sapped, consensual. At the same time, Alain Badiou says that "political" designates, on the contrary, that which escapes, and is beyond, consensus.(9) And today, with action and political thought at an ebb, politics is all too often confused with ethics—a confusion which, I mentioned this earlier, is not a deconstruction—, and there is excessive confusion between political art and ethical art.

Nor could we in any way consider Nicolas Bourriaud's micro-utopias to be political art. They are in fact even more insipid than yesterday's utopian thought (which political thought had tried to break with, without having completely succeeded). They are a utopia in the present instead of the future, reserved for a select happy-few, only lasting as long as an opening—which has now replaced the exhibition properly-speaking—in a location within the art microcosm.

One could hardly confuse Hakim Bey's Temporary Autonomous Zone notion with that of Bourriaud's micro-utopia. (10) But the notion of autonomy is just as ambiguous in both. An ambiguity which led the very-institutional Yves Michaud, in the name of artistic autonomy, to rebaptize the TAZ the "TEZ": Temporary (a)Estetic Zone (11), a qualification equally fit for a squat as for an institutional art space (this at least has the merit of showing that the difference is not really that great, even if one can no longer claim to the necessity of escaping any institutionalization of art, as the avant-gardes did).


Jacques Rancière, for his part, would like to distinguish political art from all forms of ethical art, as well as from Bourriaud's micro-utopian art; but his concept of political art is also unconvincing.(12) Rancière is content with stating that the rise of nineteenth-century realism gave way to an "esthetic regime of art," while hurriedly rejecting all categorizations and periodizations in use for the epoch. This "esthetic regime of art" is an art preserved in its autonomy, as all reality is hence representable (although this was the case previously, with the qualification that reality had to be presented in an "appropriate" style and genre, in accordance with the theory of stylistic levels). And this last fact makes this art political insofar as it grants access to a mode of "distribution of the sensible/perceptible" (partage du sensible) in which each person has a stake in a shared difference from the governing society's distribution, which always leaves certain people out, produces disenfranchised people whose political action is to demand their say, proletarians, lumpenproletarians, or (using current jargon) the excluded. Yet, there are many who are excluded from what one could call the "distribution of art"—the "democratization" of representation in no way implies that of art itself. Despite Rancière's critique of Adorno, his concept evokes the latter's, for whom art was revolutionary by its very nature insofar as it made clear, in an exemplary way, that freedom is possible within the (autonomous) domain of art—thereby suggesting that freedom may be possible in other areas, as well.

Referring to Deleuze, Paul Ardenne has put forward the notion of micro-political art. (13) But should we not avoid a scenario where yesterday's refrain of "Marx said... " is now followed by everyone bursting into a "Deleuze said... " chorus? All the more since Deleuze himself admitted he was not too keen on contemporary art, and that his concept of art was, basically, quite classical, with art deriving less from any creative intention than from some chaos/origin, evolving into compositional harmony. And if one should feel inclined to use one or the other Deleuzian concept, one should also try to pay heed to Deleuze's own view on the matter (unless, of course, one intends to explicitly criticize him). Yet Deleuze and Guattari explicitly maintain that that one should beware of separating micro-politics from macro-politics, the molecular from the molar, the local from the global. (14) Just like Bourriaud's micro-utopias and the art-as-social remedy role it falls into, art reduced to its micro-political dimension is but an enfeebled version of the early twentieth-century avant-gardes.

But, contrary to what Rancière thinks, art's relation to reality is not just representational. Art can itself intervene in reality, if only on a "micro-scale." Art itself presents us with performative aspects, starting, of course, with the locutional act of doing something "as art." But the greater question is whether art can also do something that is, it, not art. Or even, perhaps (to follow Catherine Kerbat-Orecchioni's notion (15)) to make others do something (that is, yet again, not art).

Instead of proposing a new version of political art, we will here limit ourselves to proposing that which we will call "micro-artistic" art, with the word "political" deliberately left out. Not minimal art, but instead the minimum of art. Not that this should mean isolating "micro-artistic" aspects (instead of "micro-political" ones), because micro-artistic art is fully art, both micro and macro-artistic, both the minimum and the maximum of art, is art intensively. And, being micro-artistic, it can also be something other than artistic as well, presenting, not least, a political aspect. At the same time that, naturally, there could be artistic aspects to practices not calling themselves artistic, without an artistic identity, not least of which: political practices. But without falling into the aesthetization of the political that Benjamin denounced.

("CONTRE L'ART GLOBAL, pour un art sans identité", pp. 147-155)

(1) Walter BENJAMIN, L’œuvre d’art à l’ère de sa reproductibilité technique, 1936, French translation Œuvres, tome 2, Poésie et révolution (Paris: Denoël, 1971). English version : The work of Art in the age of mechanical reproduction, in Hannah Arendt, ed.: Illuminations (New York : Schocken, 1969).
(2) Dominique BAQUÉ, Pour un nouvel art politique, De l’art contemporain au documentaire, (Paris: Flammarion, 2004).
(3) Gilles LIPOVETSKY, L’Ère du vide, Essais sur l’individualisme contemporain, (Paris: Gallimard, 1983).
(4) Jean-Paul SARTRE, Qu’est-ce que la littérature ?, (Paris: Gallimard, 1948).
(5) Pierre LÉVY, World Philosophy, Le Marché, le cyberespace, la conscience, (Paris: Odile Jacob, 2000).
(6) Allan SEKULA, Réalisme critique, interview with Pascal Beausse, French translation in Artpress n°240, November 1998.
(7) Luc BOLTANSKI and Ève CHIAPELLO, Le Nouvel esprit du capitalisme, (Paris: Gallimard, 1999).
(8) Gilles LIPOVETSKY, Le Crépuscule du devoir, L’Éthique indolore des nouveaux temps démocratiques, (Paris: Gallimard, 1992).
(9) Alain BADIOU, Le Siècle, (Paris: Seuil, 2005).
(10) Hakim BEY, TAZ, Zone autonome temporaire, 1991, French translation (Paris: Éclat, 1997).
(11) Yves MICHAUD, Arts et biotechnologies, in L’Art biotech’, (Nantes: Le Lieu unique, 2003).
(12) Jacques RANCIÈRE, Malaise dans l’esthétique, (Paris: Galilée, 2004).
(13) Paul ARDENNE and Christine MACEL, Micropolitique, Du miel aux abeilles, in Micropolitiques, (Grenoble: Magasin, 2000). Paul ARDENNE, L’Art "micropolitique", généalogie d’un genre, ibid.
(14) Gilles DELEUZE and Félix GUATTARI, Capitalisme et schizophrénie, tome 2, Milleplateaux, (Paris : Minuit, 1980).
(15) Catherine KERBRAT-ORECCHIONI, Les Actes de langage dans le discours, Théorie etfonctionnement, (Paris: Nathan, 2001).





Kommentare [10]
michel chevalier schrieb am 20.11.2008 14:06

As a sort of timely footnote, I would like to add that
Dirck Möllmann's recent exhibition review under

www.thing-hamburg.de/index.php

illustrates some of the difficulties resulting from what Moineau calls the "art/politcs contradiction."
Although I didn't see the exhibition in Lüneburg, I am nevertheless not sure Möllmann's projection of the term "political" on an exhibition under the (English-language: comme c'est global!) banner "figures and demonstrations" does the exhibiting artists any good... it may even, rather, do them harm.

Möllmann writes:

"Die Ausstellung thematisiert im Zeigen stattdessen sowohl künstlerische als auch politische Handlungen – sie „sagt“: Künstlerisches Handeln, das Öffentlichkeit herstellt (wie eine Ausstellung), ist immer auch politisch (...)"

Here, it is useful to scroll up and see how Moineau distinguishes between
(what could be a) political art and, among other things
1. "artisisation" of the political
2. ethical art
3. critical art
4. engagé art
5. the Rancièrian "eshetic regime of art" that makes all art political

One of the exhibition particiants (Hannes Loichinger) has written favorably of Rancière's work
www.textem.de/1379.0.html

So, echoing Moineau's critique of Rancière, I would like to question what Möllmann thinks about art whose relation to reality is not limited to the channel of representation, but instead intervenes in reality.

(an example? I'm not sure Moineau would agree, but let me put forward my recent sketch of George Maciunas:
www.thing-hamburg.de/index.php

------
Another point perhaps worth mentioning:
Möllman's very apt thematization of h_f_k's paradoxical "backroom" relation to the University of Lüneburg is just as applicable to "political" artists' "backroom" selection of channels such as Hamburg's Produzentengalerie for the distribution of their work.

(...and let us "preserve" this other fact, perhaps for later consideration: Jürgen Vorrath, co-owner of the aforementioned gallery, has been the University of Lüneburg's lecturing authority on the "Art Market" for many years).

Dirck Möllmann schrieb am 24.11.2008 21:17

Hallo Michel Chevalier,
vielen Dank für deine Anmerkungen. Sie wurden von dir unter diesem Text zu Moineau gepostet, beziehen sich aber auf meine Ausstellungsbesprechung. Unter anderem deswegen erst jetzt meine verspätete Antwort.
Zu George Maciunas war ein toller Künstler. Ein politisch denkender Künstler, in Anbetracht der Wirkung seiner Ideen. Manche halten seine Hausankäufe für bloße Immobilienspekulation, was sie faktisch ja auch ermöglichen, ich sehe das dennoch als politisches Handeln eines Künstlers.
Zu Jean-Claude Moineau: ich habe den Text einmal und recht flott gelesen. Ich fand ihn bis auf den letzten Absatz nicht interessant für mich, weil er sehr viele Verweise auf andere Text/Ideen/Referenzen zusammen getragen hat, die in meinem Verständnis eine deskriptive Ebene nicht verlassen haben. Sicherlich habe ich nicht alles verstanden, gechweige denn, dass ich mich daran erinnern könnte. Was ich aber erinnere ist der letzte Absatz, der die griffige Vokabel der Mikro-Ästhetik aufbringt und die Forderung: “Not minimal art, but instead the minimum of art”. Den Widerspruch finde ich interessant, allerdings verstehe ich das so, dass Moineau vom Werk ausgehend argumentiert und dafür eine nur minimale Kunsthaltigkeit fordert. Robert Smithson hat mal in Zusammenhang mit Art by Telephone (der/die Künstler/in spricht “Kunst” aufs Band) die Handlungsanweisung gegeben, in eine verlassene Baugrube eine Fuhre Beton auszuschütten, um genau diese Grenze auszutesten. Wann hört “Kunst” auf als ästhetisches Produkt in Erscheinung zu treten? Sein Fazit war für diesen Fall: sofort. Niemand hat das als “Kunst” erkannt, niemand gekauft, es wurde einmal fotografiert und zirkuliert seither als Werk im Bestandsverzeichnis.
Die Forderung von Moineau ist also nicht neu und sie bestätigt den Werkcharakter von “Kunst”, den sie durch Minimierung gerade verlassen will. Das finde ich interessant an seiner Bemerkung und das finde ich zugleich problematisch daran.
Mich interessiert natürlich “Kunst”, die sich in außerkünstlerische Sphären einmischt, sich als Kunst behauptet und der ganze Kram. Auch diese “Kunst” steckt in dem Dilemma, das oft nur der Zusammenhang oder die Selbstbehauptung durch Autoren darüber entscheidet, ob es als Kunst oder als Nicht-Kunst wahrgenommen wird.
Was Lüneburg angeht, so hat die Gruppe sich entschieden einen Kunstkontext zur Ausstellung zu wählen. Ein Grafik-Design-Büro schien nicht ihre Zielgruppe zu sein. Ich finde dabei das Agieren auf einer Entscheidungsebene zwischen Kurator/innen, Künstler/innen Theoretiker/innen bemerkenswert und auch politisch, insofern sie eine Öffentlichkeit für das Ergebnis herstellen. Dass die Gruppe das zugleich zum Thema ihrer Ausstellung macht und mit dem Zeigen auch die Funktion der Repräsentation anspricht, fand ich gut.
Dirck

Rahel Puffert schrieb am 26.11.2008 18:35

lieber Dirck lieber Michel,
an dieser Stelle würde ich mich gern einschalten.
auch ich habe Moineau erst begonnen zu verstehen und hatte am meisten Aufmerksamkeit für das "Minimum an Kunst", dass er in Anschlag bringt und für das er gleichzeitig ihr "Maximum" reserviert. Aus meiner Sicht ist das gerade deshalb interessant, WEIL es nicht neu ist, aber von Moineau, indem dieser sich durch die verschiedenen, verwirrenden Ansätze derzeitiger Kunsttheorie durcharbeitet , wieder hervorgeholt, erinnert wird: Als eine Möglichkeit, Kunst einen Weg zu bahnen, der sich außerhalb der sofortigen Verwertung bewegt. Und hier muss ich dir, Dirck auch widersprechen. Solche Kunst ist nicht notwendig auf Autorschaft oder Werkhaftigkeit angewiesen. Ihre gewahr zu werden, hängt nicht davon ab, ob die die an ihr Teil haben, eine Möglichkeit nutzen, sie offiziell so zu nennen und in den Kreislauf der Besitzlogik zu überführen. Genau darin besteht ihr Stärke.

Was an der Lüneburger Ausstellung mir doch ein wenig merkwürdig vorkommt, ist ihre dem akademischem Geschmack entgegenkommende Ästhetik. Diese ist fürchte ich genau da schwach, wo es drum geht, ihre Politizität zu behaupten: wenn es darum geht, sich Adressaten zu suchen, die sich ebenfalls der Verwertungslogik entziehen und denen zu verweigern, die sie skrupellos daran anschließen. Und außerdem ist die Gruppe eben ja keinesfalls autorlos, wie dein Artikel -darauf wurde ja bereits verwiesen - sehr deutlich macht.
Mit Grüßen
Rahel (sorry fo answering in German)

Katrin schrieb am 30.11.2008 11:13

i would like to comment on some points of the discussion, f.e.:
"whose relation to reality is not limited to the channel of representation, but instead intervenes in reality."

i would say, that' s not a limit in our understanding of reality.
and in our decision to do art as a format that speaks and writes with and about representation. and critically reflects on. this again becomes and is part of reality. and not something that just wants to sell and be corruptly im kreislauf von besitzlogiken....
ich finde der kurzschluss kunst - markt - verwertung passiert hier zu schnell und undifferenziert. nicht zuletzt: die installation ist nicht verkäuflich, in ihren materialien sehr temporär angelegt; sie hat sehr wenig gekostet, niemand hat was verdient, alle haben umsonst gearbeitet dafür.

auch weiss ich nicht wirklich ob man vom akademischen als einer grösse sprechen kann, dem das geschmäcklerisch gefallen könnte. was ist das akademische? wer steckt dahinter? kenne das nicht, das ist doch extrem wandelbar. und auch nicht in eins zu setzen mit dem kunstmarkt. also im ganzen würde ich nicht so sehr von entitäten sprechen, denen man ausgeliefert ist.

und was sind autorlose gruppen? man kann doch immer nur autorschaft befragen und neu verhandeln. komplett auflösen lässt sie sich nicht! oder?

Rahel Puffert schrieb am 30.11.2008 17:24

liebe katrin,
ich bezog mich in meiner stellungnahme auf die kontextualisierung eurer ausstellung von dirck. leider habe ich die ausstellung nur über seinen bebilderten beitrag rezipiert. und darin fand ich verschiedene hinweise, die mich bewogen haben, meinen eindruck davon (ungeschützt) mit den worten "dem akademischen geschmack entgegenkommend" zu bezeichnen. Zusammengesetzt hat sich dieser eindruck aus beschreibungen wie folgenden:

"behutsam", "bedacht"

derridaistische metonymische dissemination: "zeichen verstreuen sich, werden unscheinbar, aber ansteckend" in Absetzung zu Metaphern wie "hitzige zusammenballung" und "herd"

"Fragen grundsätzlicher Art, die mitunter akademisch klingen"

"Die Gruppenarbeit versteht sich im Sinne eines forschenden Kuratierens, das insbesondere durch Beatrice von Bismarck an der Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst in Leipzig theoretisch wie praktisch an der Institution verankert wird."
"konzentriert"
"scheinbar nachlässig"
"formale Nüchternheit"
"unzugänglich und irgendwie schleierhaft"
"auf Kennerschaft angewiesen"
"kein zupackendes Auge wird erheischt"
"... kommt dem schweifenden Blick entgegen, der mustert, liest, vergleicht"
Im Übrigen habe ich auch keine Gleichsetzung Eurer Arbeit mit dem Kunstmarkt unternommen, sondern die Befürchtung geäußert, ob sich ihre politische Dimension, wie von Dirck herausgearbeitet, auch in anderen Kontexten bewährt... Das ist ein Unterschied.
Wenn ich das befürchte, steckt da durchaus Sympathie drin, denn jener „akademische Geschmack“ ist mir nicht ganz fremd. Allerdings bin ich gerade deshalb auch skeptisch – auch mir selbst gegenüber. Was mir an Dircks Bewertungen Unbehagen bereitet, ist, dass darin subtil wiederkehrt, was Tradition hat und keine gute: Dreckiges, Direktes, Angriffslustiges, Fehlerhafes, Körperliches wird mit einem Mangel an Differenziertheit oder Durchdachtheit assoziert. Kehrt da nicht die Aussonderung des „Barbarischen Geschmacks“ wieder wie Kant sie uns nun schon seit Jahrhunderten diktiert? Wenn man sich nun schon auf das Ausstellen und die Zeichenprache des Zeigens reduziert, sollten man die soziopolitischen Dimensionen dessen vielleicht auch mitbedenken (dürfen). Oder?

michel chevalier schrieb am 02.12.2008 15:48

Dear Dirck, Dear Rahel, Dear Katrin,

Thanks for your input. Here goes a two-step answer process (and sorry, it's in English, and LONG!!!)

1. Moineau's "answer": I just spoke to Jean-Claude Moineau on the phone and went over (in French) the comments referring to his text with him. I will first report what he had to answer (supplemented with some comments of my own).

2. My answer to the other comments referring to what I posted above, and words about some points discussed among you.

1.
Referring to Dirck (Comment 2):
a) Moineau stresses—this is the most important point—that his writing has incessantly called into question both the notion of "Work / Oeuvre / Werk" and that of "Author."
Insofar, he takes issue with Dirck's observation that
"Die Forderung von Moineau (...) bestätigt den Werkcharakter von “Kunst” (...)"

but agrees on the whole with the opinion Rahel voiced (Comment 3).

He adds that he favors indetermination, not being able decide if something is art or non-art.

b) To Dirck's comment
"Ich fand ihn bis auf den letzten Absatz nicht interessant für mich, weil er sehr viele Verweise auf andere Text/Ideen/Referenzen zusammen getragen hat, die in meinem Verständnis eine deskriptive Ebene nicht verlassen haben."

Moineau clarifies that, to him "in able to employ critique, it is necessary to remind oneself of what the issue is" ("pour porter critique, il faut se rappeler de quoi il s'agit")
If I may add: as the translator, I have trouble understanding the description "confined to the descriptive level":
Moineau, especially in the Chapter "For a Micro-artistic Art," systematically summarizes, "finds bugs in," and bears judgment on the competing art-approaches. How can these judgments, the points he always concludes with, be taken as mere "description"?

c) Moineau voices some reservation about Dirck's associating Robert Smithson with the statement “not minimal art, but instead the minimum of art.”
Moineau, by contrast, sees Smithson's work as "art en tant que tel" (art-as-such), and the cited work as a "stereotyped version of the art of the period" ("des trous, il y en avait des quantités")
(If I may add: I would have preferred this work of Smithson's if it had only been the telephone instructions (minus the execution by the renowned artist). The art-by-telephone project is itself more related to the ideas of fluxus and, logically, participants in the 1969 exhibition included George Brecht, Dick Higgins, Stan Vanderbeek, and Wolf Vostell)

Referring to Katrin, who wrote
"i would like to comment on some points of the discussion, f.e.:
"whose relation to reality is not limited to the channel of representation, but instead intervenes in reality."

i would say, that' s not a limit in our understanding of reality."

Moineau wants to insist that "representation" and "intervention" are two parts of reality that can be distinguished from one another.
If I may add (and sorry for the confusions that may arise from my writing in English on the thing-hamburg page!): no one is denying that representation is ALSO a part of reality.
The limit is not one of "understanding", but a LIMITATION (and this is my point of view— Rancière would disagree) of art when it does not go beyond "representing," when it does not take the step of intervening in the surrounding reality (as Maciunas' projects did, in my view).

2.
a) Referring to Dirck's passing reference to Maciunas:
"Manche halten seine Hausankäufe für bloße Immobilienspekulation, was sie faktisch ja auch ermöglichen"

I believe that what "ermöglicht" Soho real-estate speculation was hardly what Maciunas did, but instead the change in New York City zoning laws, combined with Nixon-era federal tax advantages for real estate investors.

I would, still, also be interested in what Dirck sees as the difference between political art and ethical- engagé- and /or- critical art. Where would he draw the line between "political art" and the aesthetization of the political?

b) With reference to the discussion between Katrin and Rahel:

-I would like to hear more about what Rahel means by "Besitzlogik"

- When Katrin writes
"ich finde der kurzschluss kunst - markt - verwertung passiert hier zu schnell und undifferenziert."
I think what is at issue is the description of a movement, and whether the description is accurate or not. If an accurate description of a movement can be summarized by a simple (or "schnell") formula, I have no problem and see no reason to call it a "kurzschluss."

A famous example is Marx's conclusion of Chapter 4 in Capital, Vol. 1 (sorry again for the English version):
"M-C-M' is in fact therefore the general formula for capital, in the form in which it appears directly in the sphere of circulation"
(M=money, C= commodity, M'= more money)

Now, if something is missing, then we could call Rahel's description a "kurzschluss"— but that begs the question: what is missing? I would be interested in why Katrin finds there is a lack of differentiation. If there are some artists who sell in commercial galleries in an anticapitalist way, I would sure be glad to hear about it.

As someone who has dealt with artmarket-issues lately, and who published an extensive review on this website dealing with the commodity-nature of Tino Sehgal's supposedly "immaterial" work, I think the equation "kunst - markt - verwertung" (K-M-V) is a pretty fair description of "well-functioning" art-business (although, to settle any doubts, I would need a little orientation on what is here meant by "Verwertung"). Galleries, like other businesses, make use of "loss-leaders" (apparently unprofitable, uncommercial products) in order to benefit the bottom line.
see
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loss_leader
A "loss-leader" artist, in a commercial gallery, is serving the commercial interest of that gallery. And may, over time (that's the "économie à l'envers" phenomenon Bourdieu theorized) turn quite profitable, both for the collectors and the gallerist—maybe even for the artists' descendants (if he or she has any).

Yours truly,
Michel

Martin schrieb am 03.12.2008 20:22

Liebe Vorredner,

Auch etwas länger und auf deutsch. Damit es alle wissen: Ich bin auch Teil der Gruppe, die für die Ausstellung in Lüneburg verantwortlich war. Einige Anmerkungen zu der Debatte:

1. Zu Kunst, Markt und Verwertung
2. Zu George Maciunas
3. Zu dem Text von Moineau

1. Katrin wollte, wie eigentlich offensichtlich erkennbar, nicht sagen, daß es gar keinen Zusammenhang zwischen Kunst, Markt und Verwertung gebe, sondern daß hier differenziert werden muß: nicht alle Kunst ist unmittelbar nur für einen Markt produziert und geht vollständig in einem Verwertungsinteresse auf.

Es folgen dann, von dir, Michel, polemische Anwürfe, die für mich an der Sache vorbeigehen:

If there are some artists who sell in commercial galleries in an anticapitalist way, I would sure be glad to hear about it.

Galleries, like other businesses, make use of "loss-leaders" (apparently unprofitable, uncommercial products) in order to benefit the bottom line.

Hierzu ist ganz einfach zu bemerken: Die Ausstellung in Lüneburg wurde nie für einen Markt konzipiert und wird auch nicht in einer Galerie verkauft. Rahel macht ja auch deutlich, daß sie das nicht gemeint hat. Den Hinweis von ‚Jeunesse‘, daß auch das Ausstellen in einer kleinen Institution mit symbolischem Kapital zu tun hat, finde ich legitim. Schwierig ist, dem vollständig zu entgehen. Auch Moineau publiziert sein Buch unter einem Namen und bei einem Verlag, dessen Interesse offensichtlich darauf geht, Bücher zu verkaufen. Auch der gelobte George Maciunas war bei einem Filmfestival und in der Akademie der Künste vertreten. Solche Institutionen bekommen zumeist Geld aus öffentlichen Mitteln, zunehmend aber auch aus privaten. Selbstverständlich muß dies alles kritisch hinterfragt und thematisiert werden. Vielleicht wird man sich auch in bestimmten Fällen dagegen entscheiden müssen. Es hilft der kritischen Reflexion allerdings nicht, alles in einen Topf zu werfen und sich damit der Handlungsspielräume zu berauben, die es (noch) gibt. Deshalb Katrins Vorschlag, es differenzierter zu betrachten.

2. Es ist offensichtlich, daß die Ausstellung in Lüneburg kein soziales Wohnprojekt für Künstler ist, wie es Maciunas organisiert hat. Dies beruht auf einer bewußten Entscheidung der Beteiligten, eine Ausstellung machen zu wollen. Ich frage mich, ob überhaupt irgend eine Ausstellung diesem Kriterium genügen kann, bzw. ob es Ausstellungen gibt, die du, Michel, gut findest.

Zu folgender Debatte:
Dirk: "Manche halten seine Hausankäufe für bloße Immobilienspekulation, was sie faktisch ja auch ermöglichen"

Michel: I believe that what "ermöglicht" Soho real-estate speculation was hardly what Maciunas did, but instead the change in New York City zoning laws, combined with Nixon-era federal tax advantages for real estate investors.

Hier möchte ich einfach nur auf das hinlänglich bekannte Phänomen der ‚Gentrifizierung‘ verweisen, d.h. das Phänomen der sogenannten ‚Aufwertung‘ eines Stadtviertels, die dessen ursprüngliche Bewohner verdrängt. Dies beginnt häufig mit der Besiedelung durch Künstler und anderen Gruppen, die das Gebiet dann für eine reichere, bürgerliche Klientel, und damit auch für Immobilienspekulation interessant machen. Soho ist ein prominentes Beispiel dafür, ein anderes wäre das Schanzenviertel. Ich finde es legitim von Dirk, darauf hinzuweisen. Auch dies muß differenziert betrachtet werden. Es muß nicht die Intention von Maciunas gewesen sein, dies in Gang zu setzen, war aber sicherlich auch ein Effekt davon (neben vielen anderen Faktoren). Jedenfalls zeigt es meiner Ansicht nach, daß Kunst (falls man das so nennen will), die versucht, in die ‚Realität‘ zu intervenieren, nicht schon deshalb per se ‚gut‘ (in einem ethischen Sinne) ist, bzw. sich derartigen Mechanismen entziehen kann.


3. Zum Text von Moineau: Damit wir nicht nur über eine Ausstellung diskutieren, die die eine Hälfte der Leute nur aus einer Besprechung kennt, möchte ich mich auch mal zu dem Text äußern, der offensichtlich als Folie der Kritik an der Ausstellung verwendet wird.
Ich weiß, daß es sich nur um Ausschnitte und eine Übersetzung aus einem längeren Buch handelt. Da es aber nichts anderes gibt, und es in der bisherigen Diskussion so schien, als ergäbe sich aus den beiden Kapiteln ein repräsentatives Bild, hier meine persönliche Meinung dazu:

Zum ersten Kapitel: ‚From Total Art to Global Art‘

Das erste Kapitel, soweit ich es verstehe, setzt sich aus vier Elementen zusammen:
1.) Boris Groys‘ Thesen über den Zusammenhang von Avantgarde und Stalinismus
2.) Die klassisch gewordene Theorie der ‚Kulturindustrie‘ und des ‚Spektakels‘
3.) Boltanski/Chiapello‘s Theorie des postfordistischen Netzwerkkapitalismus
4.) Beobachtungen zu dem Phänomen, das man ‚Biennalisierung‘ nennt

Das erste Element begründet dabei das Label ‚Total Art‘, das Avantgarde, Stalinismus etc. indifferent enthält. Der Begriff der ‚Global Art‘, die der Nachfolger der ‚Total Art‘ ist, verknüpft dann die letzten drei Elemente und führt dabei noch einmal die grandiose Theorie des Spektakels vor, aus dem es kein entkommen gibt: Alles ist ein und derselbe Brei, Kritik ist überhaupt nicht mehr möglich, alles ist sinnlos: „The artworld mutates into the art network, both market and institutional, tightly interconnected, really only one and the same.“ Jeder, der auch nur mal eine Kunstinstitution betreten hat, ist automatisch auch Teil des Kunstmarkts und des Spektakels.

Interessant ist, daß ‚global art‘ eine Kunst ist, die, so der Übersetzer, „nach Moineau vor allem durch ihre Eigenschaft, zur allgemeinen Konfusion beizutragen, gekennzeichnet“ ist. Polemisch gesagt: Unabhängig davon, daß man vielen Einzelheiten zustimmen kann, ist es vor allem der Autor, der zur ‚allgemeinen Konfusion‘ beiträgt, indem er alles vermischt und miteinander gleichsetzt.


Das zweite Kapitel, Zu folgender Charakterisierung des Übersetzers:

Moineau, especially in the Chapter "For a Micro-artistic Art," systematically summarizes, "finds bugs in," and bears judgment on the competing art-approaches.

‚systematisch‘ ist m.E. nicht der richtige Ausdruck für dieses eklektische Bashing aller möglichen Theorieansätze der letzten Jahrzehnte. Keine der verwendeten Kategorien von ‚political art‘, ‚ethical art‘ , ‚art engagé‘, ‚critical art‘ etc. wird jemals definiert oder auch nur irgendwie gesagt, wie sich diese unterscheiden sollen.

Was macht man z.B. mit einer solchen Unterscheidung, wenn zugleich überhaupt nicht klar ist, was der Begriff des Politischen hier bedeutet:

„It would still be appropriate to distinguish between political and engagé art, even if this distinction could itself be deconstructed, or even destroyed.“

sollen wir jetzt unterscheiden oder die Unterscheidung dekonstruieren oder zerstören? Warum verzichten wir nicht auf diese Unterscheidung, wenn sie auch einfach wegfallen kann?

- ‚finds bugs in‘ ist aber schon eine richtigere Beschreibung. Generell ist keine ernsthafte Bemühung zu erkennen, sich mit diesen Theorien auseinanderzusetzen, um vielleicht daran weiterzuarbeiten. Die einzige Intention scheint darin zu bestehen, diese als ‚passé‘ und ‚gescheitert‘ zurückzuweisen, und dafür irgendwelche Gründe zu finden, oder eben gar keine:

„But then we shouldn't limit ourselves to reproducing existing schemas that have all failed.“

Alle existierenden Schemata sind also gescheitert. Warum sind diese alle gescheitert? Alles bleibt völlig theoretisch, an keiner Stelle wird tatsächlich eine bestimmte Kunstpraxis oder ein bestimmtes Kunstwerk auf sein Gelingen oder Scheitern untersucht. (in zwei Fällen wird das allerdings einfach behauptet)

Interessant ist hier die einleitende Charakterisierung durch den Übersetzer:
„Die sprachliche Machart der einzelnen Kapitel wechselt vom theoretisch-reflexiven zum literarischen Text oder manifest-artigen Gedicht.“

Genau diese Machart eines ‚Manifests‘, mit dem sich der Autor in die Tradition der Avantgarden stellt (die er selbst als gescheitert betrachtet), erklärt meines Erachtens, warum dieser Text insgesamt so wenig überzeugend ist. In einer Art anti-institutionellem Reflex wird zunächst alles zurückgewiesen, was irgendwie ‚etabliert‘ ist oder anscheinend zur verbreiteten Meinung gehört, und offensichtlich nur aus diesem Grund.
Dies bereitet dann die eigene Konzeption vor, die dann notwendigerweise alles dagewesene überbieten muß: Die ‚mikro-artistische Kunst‘. Eben weil diese Art der Meinungsbildung heute nicht mehr so einfach funktioniert, bleibt diese Konzeption dann ein rätselhaftes Stückwerk, von dem nicht klar ist, inwiefern es sich von den zuvor abgelehnten Konzeptionen unterscheidet:

„Instead of proposing a new version of political art, we will here limit ourselves to proposing that which we will call "micro-artistic" art, with the word "political" deliberately left out. Not minimal art, but instead the minimum of art. Not that this should mean isolating "micro-artistic" aspects (instead of "micro-political" ones), because micro-artistic art is fully art, both micro and macro-artistic, both the minimum and the maximum of art, is art intensively. And, being micro-artistic, it can also be something other than artistic as well, presenting, not least, a political aspect. At the same time that, naturally, there could be artistic aspects to practices not calling themselves artistic, without an artistic identity, not least of which: political practices. But without falling into the aesthetization of the political that Benjamin denounced.“

1. Warum brauchen wir den Begriff einer ‚mirco-artistic art‘ wenn diese dann doch zugleich „micro and macro-artistic“ ist? Wofür steht ‚micro‘? Für 'lokal' im Gegensatz zu 'global', wie das zuvor nahegelegt wurde?

2. Mikro-artistische Kunst ist nicht politisch, kann aber einen politischen Aspekt haben. Worin besteht dieser ‚Aspekt‘? Haben nicht alle diejenigen Theorien der Politizität von Kunst, die zuvor mit teilweise haarsträubenden Begründungen oder ohne Begründung abgelehnt wurden, versucht, diesen ‚Aspekt‘ zu verstehen und zu definieren?

3. Wie genau kann eine Politische Praxis, die einen ‚artistic aspect‘ hat, vermeiden, in die Ästhetisierung des Politischen zu verfallen?


Erste Abschlußbemerkung:

Möglicherweise wird dieser Begriff an anderen Stellen des Buchs noch genauer erklärt und an Beispielen erläutert. Ich halte mich an diese 2 Kapitel, die der Übersetzer bewußt ausgewählt hat. Wie gesagt: wir diskutieren ja auch nicht über eine Ausstellung, sondern über eine Ausstellungsrezension.

Zweite Abschlußbemerkung:

Ich halte Moineaus Interpretation von Rancière, diesem schwebe eine politische Kunst vor, die sich bloß auf der Ebene der ‚Repräsentation‘ bewege, und damit nicht in ‚die Realität‘ eingreift, für schlicht falsch. Dies hat damit zu tun, daß Rancière die Unterscheidung von ‚Repräsentation‘ und ‚Realität‘ nicht in dieser Weise machen würde, wie sie hier vorgeschlagen wurde. Anstelle einer ausführlicheren Theoriedebatte, für die hier nicht der richtige Ort ist, will ich ein Beispiel geben, das Rancière in seinem Vortrag „Die Politik der Kunst und ihre Paradoxien“ gibt, und auf das er sich im Rahmen seiner Theorie positiv bezieht. (erschienen in der deutschen Ausgabe von „Die Aufteilung des Sinnlichen“). Es geht um ein Projekt der französischen Künstlergruppe ‚Campement Urbain‘:

„Dieses Projekt trug den Titel ‚Ich und wir‘ und bestand darin, in einem Problemviertel der Pariser Vorstädte eine neue Form des öffentlichen Raums zu schaffen: ‚einen unnützen, sehr zerbrechlichen und unproduktiven Ort‘, so die Gruppe. Dieser Ort sollte für alle zugänglich sein und von allen geschützt werden. Es konnte sich allerdings immer nur jeweils eine Person an diesem Ort aufhalten, wodurch ‚die Besinnung auf die Möglichkeit eines Ich im Wir‘ angestoßen werden sollte.“

Die Möglichkeit, die Wahrnehmung zu verändern, die Menschen von sich und ihrer Umgebung haben, und ihnen damit zu einer selbstbestimmten Artikulation zu verhelfen, ist für Rancière ein wichtigeres Kriterium für politische Kunst, als die ethischen Maximen eines sozialen Wohnprojekts für Künstler, das sich dann doch nicht denjenigen kapitalistischen Zusammenhängen (Gentrifizierung) entziehen kann, in die es versucht, einzugreifen.

Und übrigens: daß ich mich, wie auch Hannes das schon einmal getan hat, hier positiv zu Rancière äußere, heißt nicht, daß die Lüneburger Ausstellung generell eine Art Bebilderung der Theorie Rancières sein sollte, oder automatisch (guilt by association) von irgendwelchen ‚bugs‘ dieser Theorie befallen war.

Rahel Puffert schrieb am 10.12.2008 01:16

Lieber Martin,
zwei Berichtigungen zu zwei Passagen Deines Kommentars, in denen Du mangels besseren Wissen falsche Schlüsse ziehst. Die Anmoderationen und oft auch Einleitungen werden bei THE THING in der Regel von den RedakteurInnen übernommen. In diesem Fall habe ich die Anmoderation und Einleitung zur Übersetzung von Moineau geschrieben und nicht "der Übersetzer", (der im Übrigen einen Namen hat). Ich möchte die Gelegenheit nutzen, genau an diesen Stellen zu Deinem Text auch inhaltlich Stellung nehmen.
Du schreibst: ."Interessant ist, daß ‚global art‘ eine Kunst ist, die, so der Übersetzer, „nach Moineau vor allem durch ihre Eigenschaft, zur allgemeinen Konfusion beizutragen, gekennzeichnet“ ist. Polemisch gesagt: Unabhängig davon, daß man vielen Einzelheiten zustimmen kann, ist es vor allem der Autor, der zur ‚allgemeinen Konfusion‘ beiträgt, indem er alles vermischt und miteinander gleichsetzt."
Ich frage mich, warum Du Dich genau an dieser Stelle lieber auf meine notwendig zusammenfassende Einleitung beziehst, anstatt den Autor selbst zu zitieren, den Du mit Deiner polemischen Abqualifizierung ja meinst zu treffen. Ich halte das für ungeschickt, denn Moineau erläutert nicht, nur was er mit "generalizing confusion" meint, sondern der Autor hält dabei implizit auch an der Unterscheidbarkeit zwischen den folgenden Bereichen fest: "art and non-art", "art and fashion", "art and money", "art and culture", "the various arts and the cultures..." Das mag man für grob halten, es wird aber in den vorherigen Textpassagen hergeleitet und ausgeführt und dadurch noch weiter eingegrenzt. Was nun aber ist an diesen von Moineau vollzogenen Trennungen aus Deiner Sicht so verwirrend?
An anderer Stelle schriebst Du:
"-Interessant ist hier die einleitende Charakterisierung durch den Übersetzer: 
„Die sprachliche Machart der einzelnen Kapitel wechselt vom theoretisch-reflexiven zum literarischen Text oder manifest-artigen Gedicht.
Genau diese Machart eines ‚Manifests‘, mit dem sich der Autor in die Tradition der Avantgarden stellt (die er selbst als gescheitert betrachtet), erklärt meines Erachtens, warum dieser Text insgesamt so wenig überzeugend ist."
a) Diese oben zitierte Erläuterung meinerseits diente dazu, die LeserInnen darüber zu informieren, dass die nicht übersetzten Kapitel andere sprachliche Formen aufweisen. In Deiner Aburteilung beziehst Du Dich also auf einen Text, den Du und die anderen MitleserInnen nicht zur Verfügung haben. (Ich gehe mal davon aus, das Du nicht behaupten willst, dass die zwei übersetzen Kapitel einem "manifestartigen Gedicht" gleichkommen.) Aus dem nicht vorliegenden "manifest-artigen Gedicht" in meiner Anmoderation machst Du kurzerhand ein "Manifest" und ziehst dann Rückschlüsse auf die Überzeugungskraft der kunsttheoretischen Grundlagen des Dir vorliegenden Textes. Kann man machen – wie man eben so vieles machen kann, nur ob es überzeugt, ist halt wirklich immer die Frage...
Im Übrigen habe ich mich über Die Ausführlichkeit Deiner Anmerkungen gefreut.
Rahel

michel chevalier schrieb am 10.12.2008 11:42

Dear Martin,

Thanks for joining this discussion. Here, yet again, goes a two-step answer process

1. Moineau's "answer": I spoke again to Jean-Claude Moineau on the phone Sunday afternoon and went over (in French) your comments referring to his text with him. I will first report what he had to answer (supplemented with some comments of my own).

2. My answer to the other comments/questions referring to what I posted above.



1.
You wrote, in reference to Moineau's first text

>>"Das erste Element begründet dabei das Label ‚Total Art‘, das Avantgarde, Stalinismus etc. indifferent enthält,"

This is incorrect. In the above text, the first sentence refers to total art being "in gestation (...) in the "impudent 'everything is art' of the avant-gardes." Nowhere, however, does Moineau write that the avant-gardes are a part of total art.

Moineau stresses that he partially took up Adorno's critique of total art (published in French in the collection of lectures titled "l'art et les arts"), but without taking up the anti-avant-garde position that is Adorno's.

Agreeing with Groys that it is wrong to simplistically oppose avant-garde and Jdanovism, Moineau pursues this line of thought, seeing the latter as extending and destroying the avant-garde, thereby turning the (unrealised) utopia of the avant-gardes into a (realised) dystopia.


-You then summarize

>>"der Nachfolger der ‚Total Art‘ ist, verknüpft dann die letzten drei Elemente und führt dabei noch einmal die grandiose Theorie des Spektakels vor, aus dem es kein entkommen gibt: Alles ist ein und derselbe Brei, Kritik ist überhaupt nicht mehr möglich, alles ist sinnlos"

Moineau stresses that this first chapter of his book should be taken as an introduction, with ideas later developed in more detail. Your "Alles ist ein" misses part of what Moineau is saying: according to him there ARE differences that may arise, but global art erases them ("les gomme"). Critique is possible, but difficult because it is then coopted ("prise à son compte") by the other camp and in-place institutions. This does NOT mean that critique is not operating and operative ("opérante") —in a valuable way—namely, at the moment that it is first made.


-You conclude the paragraph

>>"Jeder, der auch nur mal eine Kunstinstitution betreten hat, ist automatisch auch Teil des Kunstmarkts und des Spektakels."

Moineau: "Foucault insisted that one should not accord to great an importance to institutions. The question of institutions is not in the foreground of this work, and I do not have an anti-institution position. As a university professional I am in the institution (although not in the artistic insitution as-such)."


-You add,

>>"Polemisch gesagt: Unabhängig davon, daß man vielen Einzelheiten zustimmen kann, ist es vor allem der Autor, der zur ‚allgemeinen Konfusion‘ beiträgt, indem er alles vermischt und miteinander gleichsetzt."

Moineau responds that this is polemics pure and simple. It is the current world of art that is mixing things up, not him.


-Moving on to my defense that Moineau's approach is hardly mere "description" (as Dirck said it was), you contrast my words with your own view that

>>"‚systematisch‘ ist m.E. nicht der richtige Ausdruck für dieses eklektische Bashing aller möglichen Theorieansätze der letzten Jahrzehnte."

Moineau responds that
-with regard to older theories (such as Sartre's): he is trying to see what part of them is still operating today, in our changed and distinct circumstances.
-with regard to contemporary theories: he is trying to see what parts of them he agrees with and what part he doesn't.


-You add,
>>"Keine der verwendeten Kategorien von ‚political art‘, ‚ethical art‘ , ‚art engagé‘, ‚critical art‘ etc. wird jemals definiert oder auch nur irgendwie gesagt, wie sich diese unterscheiden sollen."

The issue of "ethic" discourse in art was criticised in a precise way, but not developed in detail because Moineau agrees with Badiou, whose work he cites, on the point. Sartre was cited as the theorist of art engagé, and Moineau doesn't see a point in trying to revive or further develop the concept today.
Critical art was examined and located in its recent historical development.

Moineau adds a further point, which may not have been clear in the text: whereas political art must have, in his opinion, a bearing to macro-politcs (it's not possible to do "political art in your corner"), critical art doesn't require such a dimension.


-You then ask
>>"Was macht man z.B. mit einer solchen Unterscheidung, wenn zugleich überhaupt nicht klar ist, was der Begriff des Politischen hier bedeutet (...)
>>„It would still be appropriate to distinguish between political and engagé art, even if this distinction could itself be deconstructed, or even destroyed.“
>>sollen wir jetzt unterscheiden oder die Unterscheidung dekonstruieren oder zerstören? Warum verzichten wir nicht auf diese Unterscheidung, wenn sie auch einfach wegfallen kann?"

Moineau thinks the term "political" and his intentions were clear within the text. He doesn't have the pretension of being able to write political theory.

As he mentioned just before the passage you cite, deconstruction and destruction are not the same thing. Moineau is using the term from Derrida, according to whom it is not possible to deconstruct without first operating distinctions. Moineau is for deconstructing the terms, not "destroying" them.

As the translator, I would like to thank you for bringing this point up, Martin, because going over the text closely with Moineau it appeared to me that I misunderstood his use of the term "sinon" (in French: either "or else" or "if not"). I have accordingly changed the end of the translated passage to read so:

"It would still be appropriate to distinguish between political and engagé art, even if this distinction could itself be deconstructed (although not destroyed)."


-You then add rather severly,
>>"- ‚finds bugs in‘ ist aber schon eine richtigere Beschreibung. Generell ist keine ernsthafte Bemühung zu erkennen, sich mit diesen Theorien auseinanderzusetzen, um vielleicht daran weiterzuarbeiten. Die einzige Intention scheint darin zu bestehen, diese als ‚passé‘ und ‚gescheitert‘ zurückzuweisen (...)

Moineau insists that he does not use the term "passé" (or the Hegelian term "overcome"). With regard to "failure/gescheitert", he does not regard any failure/defeat as unilateral or irreversible. It is useful here to remember Popper's description of scientific method: a hypothesis as a starting point must then be tested, and if it "fails" one modifies the hypothesis, and tests again, repeating the procedure until it is in accord with facts. You need failures to move forward.

>> (...) oder eben gar keine:
>>„But then we shouldn't limit ourselves to reproducing existing schemas that have all failed.“
>>Alle existierenden Schemata sind also gescheitert. Warum sind diese alle gescheitert?

As the translator I have to answer this one: Martin, I'm afraid you mistook what is a restrictive clause in my English for a extra-information (non-defining) clause ("that" is not the same as "which").
Moineau is obviously not saying "we shouldn't limit ourselves to reproducing existing schemas, which have all failed."

-going on, you reproach Moineau
>>"Alles bleibt völlig theoretisch, an keiner Stelle wird tatsächlich eine bestimmte Kunstpraxis oder ein bestimmtes Kunstwerk auf sein Gelingen oder Scheitern untersucht.

Chapter 5 of "Contre l'art global" contains detailed examination of works by, among others, Marc Auger, Anthony Hernandez, Jaqueline Salmon, Alfredo Jaar, Boris Mikhailov.
Kristine Barut Dreuilhe has translated this chapter into English, on another website, see
pourinfos.org/index.php


-You continue,
>>"In einer Art anti-institutionellem Reflex wird zunächst alles zurückgewiesen, was irgendwie ‚etabliert‘ ist oder anscheinend zur verbreiteten Meinung gehört, und offensichtlich nur aus diesem Grund."

Moineau insists, once again, that it's not an "anti-institutional reflex."


>>"Dies bereitet dann die eigene Konzeption vor, die dann notwendigerweise alles dagewesene überbieten muß"

For Moineau, it's not an issue of "überbieten." He wants to call notions into question in order to move forward.


>>"Wofür steht ‚micro‘? Für 'lokal' im Gegensatz zu 'global', wie das zuvor nahegelegt wurde?"

No. Please see corresponding passage in above text:
"Yet today, consideration of local dimensions, despite all the inital enthusiasm this approach first gathered, has shown itself incapable of really standing up to the global dimension, or even of resisting it. The local is itself globalized, "glocalised."


>>"2. Mikro-artistische Kunst ist nicht politisch, kann aber einen politischen Aspekt haben. Worin besteht dieser ‚Aspekt‘? Haben nicht alle diejenigen Theorien der Politizität von Kunst, die zuvor mit teilweise haarsträubenden Begründungen oder ohne Begründung abgelehnt wurden, versucht, diesen ‚Aspekt‘ zu verstehen und zu definieren?"

Moineau insists that micro-artistic art CAN have a political aspect, but doesn't always necessarily have one. It is not possible to define in advance what for the moment is merely a possibility.
The question of whether this aspect is micro- or macro-artistic will be treated soon, in a text Moineau is writing with Suely Rolnik.


>>"3. Wie genau kann eine Politische Praxis, die einen ‚artistic aspect‘ hat, vermeiden, in die Ästhetisierung des Politischen zu verfallen?"

Moineau responds: if one holds to the distinction he makes between esthetic art and non-esthetic art, the question need not really be raised. But: can there be artistisation (not esthetisation)? That's a real question that demands some thought, and that is not answered in the book.


-In response to your concluding comment
>>"Ich halte Moineaus Interpretation von Rancière, diesem schwebe eine politische Kunst vor, die sich bloß auf der Ebene der ‚Repräsentation‘ bewege, und damit nicht in ‚die Realität‘ eingreift, für schlicht falsch."

Moineau responds that Rancière remains in an Adornian logic. Moineau finds it completely mistaken when Rancière maintains that everything is representable in the régime esthétique, whereas in the régime représentatif everything wasn't. Moineau looks to Erich Aeurbach's work as demonstrating that everything, precisely, was representable previous to what Rancière calls the régime esthétique— representable within styles and genres. (This point is also mentioned in the above text). Everything has its part ('tout avait sa part', to take up Rancière's vocabulary) in the régime représentatif.
Today, however, there is an valid issue that needs to be raised (as Bourdieu does): that's the problem of access, and Rancière's theory of the régime esthétique des arts does nothing to challenge ("remettre en cause") the current situation. He leaves the problem out ("il évacue la question").

The text Rancière wrote about Campement Urbain you, Martin, mention was not included in the French version of "Le partage du sensible."
The references to Rancière in "Contre l'art global..." refer to what Rancière had published up to the time that Moineau was preparing his manuscript. Up to that time at least, in Moineau's view, Rancière sees art within representation, and does not treat the performative aspects of art.


2.
With regard to comments/questions you addressed in my direction, there are three points I would like to briefly address (and one at somewhat more length):

a) You strung together two disparate quotes of mine and labeled the result thus:
>>"Es folgen dann, von dir, Michel, polemische Anwürfe, die für mich an der Sache vorbeigehen:

If there are some artists who sell in commercial galleries in an anticapitalist way, I would sure be glad to hear about it.

Galleries, like other businesses, make use of "loss-leaders" (apparently unprofitable, uncommercial products) in order to benefit the bottom line."

I will deal with the gallery issue below; but first: when you use the word "polemical" to describe soberly formulated statements by someone who has researched a topic (just as you do when you label Moineau's approach as "Bashing"), I'm afraid to say it really comes off more like you're trying to project some spurious "ill-behavior" on the voices of opinions you happen not to like.
Rahel put it well above
>>Dreckiges, Direktes, Angriffslustiges, Fehlerhafes, Körperliches wird mit einem Mangel an Differenziertheit oder Durchdachtheit assoziert. Kehrt da nicht die Aussonderung des „Barbarischen Geschmacks“ wieder wie Kant sie uns nun schon seit Jahrhunderten diktiert?

b)
>>"Ich frage mich, ob überhaupt irgend eine Ausstellung diesem Kriterium genügen kann, bzw. ob es Ausstellungen gibt, die du, Michel, gut findest."

Most recently, the PÖPP exhibition that just ended at NGBK in Berlin. Many of my better, recent, experiences in the contemporary art context, however, were either outside the art-space exhibition format, or they adopted "expanded exhibition" approaches, such as Hamburg's WSW#2.

c)
>>"Hier möchte ich einfach nur auf das hinlänglich bekannte Phänomen der ‚Gentrifizierung‘ verweisen, d.h. das Phänomen der sogenannten ‚Aufwertung‘ eines Stadtviertels, die dessen ursprüngliche Bewohner verdrängt. Dies beginnt häufig mit der Besiedelung durch Künstler und anderen Gruppen, die das Gebiet dann für eine reichere, bürgerliche Klientel, und damit auch für Immobilienspekulation interessant machen. (...) Es muß nicht die Intention von Maciunas gewesen sein, dies in Gang zu setzen, war aber sicherlich auch ein Effekt davon (neben vielen anderen Faktoren)."

"(...) War aber sicherlich" does not persuade me. A Wikipedia article may be enough to indicate some roughly-formulated historical patterns (artists-->galleries-->yuppies), but jumping from this level of description to a value-judgment on Macunias' work and the validity of his project, as you do when you write

>> (...) ein wichtigeres Kriterium für politische Kunst, als die ethischen Maximen eines sozialen Wohnprojekts für Künstler, das sich dann doch nicht denjenigen kapitalistischen Zusammenhängen (Gentrifizierung) entziehen kann, in die es versucht, einzugreifen.

is a bit too fast, and makes me suspect another motive. Let me add: If there were some sociological or ethnographic studies, from that period— or historical evidence— that corroborated your point, I would be very interested, and would reevaluate this chapter of his work accordingly. As it is (and I mentioned this in my piece on Maciunas), the residents of "his" buildings are practically the only non-millionaires in the area (according to a NYT article from 1992).

Another point: "artists" are a very, very heterogeneous group. If there were any sociological research into the "artist-->gentrification" thesis that actually DIFFERENTIATED "artists" according to criteria such as their art-approaches (art market/alternative/community), social/class backgrounds, or geographical origins, I think much light could be shed on understanding this issue.

Lastly:
I am struck by the fact that both you and Dirck dwell on only one point of Maciunas' work that I mentioned in the sketch I linked to above— but neglect this essential one: Maciunas extended his political conviction into a refusal of (and distribution-alternative to) commercial art galleries.

That example (and many others since) is enough to make me look twice at the distribution channels used by artists brought into connection with the term "political."

It may not seem fair to you, or may "an der Sache vorbeigehen," but I have come to judge artistic projects, individual or collective, in light of all the distribution channels consciously selected for that project, (AND, in the case of collective projects, the channels consciously selected by each of the participating artists for their solo-work), and feel this has, like Moineau's writing, helped me cut through the confusion of the contemporary art world, to no little extent.

Yours truly,
Michel

jeunesse schrieb am 29.01.2009 20:06

Ich kann den ganzen Referenzen, in denen sich die Diskussion immer mehr verlor, leider nicht mehr folgen, und es ist auch bedauerlich, dass sie nicht (zugleich auch) unter der Ausstellungsrezension erscheint, die sie ja auch mit kommentiert. Weil sie spannend ist, und das, was ich mir unter the Thing vorstelle.

Wonach ich fragte, waren die Adressaten dieses Zeigens in Lüneburg, und die Antwort kennen wir ja eigentlich alle. Die akademistische, zeitgemässe, minimal-chique, konzeptuelle Ästhetik zielt auch darauf ab, dieses Publikum zu bedienen, und ein anderes - meine Oma oder meinen Nachbar oder Lüneburger Gewerkschaftsmitglieder - mit spöttisch-überheblicher Geste auf seine eigene, mangelnde Kennerschaft zurückzuwerfen. Das ist Machtausübung. Die Checker nicken verschwörerisch, die andern gucken hilflos und wissen, sie sind nicht dabei. Aber sie können ja eine Führung machen. Immerhin, eins ist sofort klar - das muss irgendwie Kunst sein.

Ob Macunias' oder anderer Künstler ältere Reaktionen auf/gegen all diese Dinge nun gelungen oder nicht waren, immerhin unternahmen sie Versuche. Eine solche Ausstellung dagegen erschöpft sich in der Selbstreferentialität, und hat auch noch das selbe Problem wie eine politische Punkplatte - der Adressat ist sowieso schon einverstanden mit allem, was da gesagt wird, die - mehr oder weniger eindringliche Ansprache - somit für die Katz. Was letztlich bleibt, ist ein weiterer hübscher Baustein im CV.

Und was das Thema verkäuflich/unverkäuflich angeht, so werden hier ja Kredite mit symbolischem Kapital vergeben. Diese Kredite kann man dann wieder ausgeben und sich schöne neue symbolische Sachen davon kaufen, Stipendien, weitere Ausstellungsbeteiligungen, Renommee. Und natürlich zahlt sich das alles dann irgendwann auch in ganz realem Kapital aus. Das kann man schlimm finden oder normal oder irgendwie witzig und modern. Jeder möchte gerne in Florenzer Villen gastieren, es ist schön und glamourös und per se überhaupt nicht verwerflich. Auch wenn nicht alle dürfen. Sondern nur die, die Deutschland als Aushängeschild international repräsentieren sollen.

Das alles aber zu negieren, zu relativieren, und zu behaupten, da sei in Lüneburg irgend etwas politisches passiert, ist lächerlich. Auch wenn der aktuelle Meckseper-Glamour des Politischen den Künstlern zweifellos gut stehen mag.

Wenn man sich noch explizit auf Langlois bezieht, so landet man schnell beim Mai 1968 in Frankreich, der auch mit einer Solidarisierung von Demonstranten mit der cinematheque begann. Da stand noch was auf den Schildern, die Frage wäre, ob es denn wirklich überholt und gegessen ist. Wenn ja, dann wäre die Aussage der leeren Schilder gewesen: Wir hissen die weiße Flagge, und das aber bitte subventioniert. Weil die FDP will man dann ja doch nicht sein.

Von Langlois und dem Mai 68 ist es ja wiederum kein weiter Weg zu den Situationisten (ebenso eine beliebte Referenz, die manche heute ja noch in ihrem Facebook-Profil mit sich selbst kontextualisieren möchten, um sich so mit deren radikalem Anspruch etwas aufzuladen). Die allerdings hätten für diese Art von Politiksimulation schon damals nur Verachtung übrig gehabt.

Heute war übrigens ein Generalstreik in Frankreich. Die Dummerchen haben bestimmt auch wieder dummes naives Zeug auf ihre Protestschilder geschrieben, obwohl wir Smarten doch alle wissen, wie sixties und vorbei sowas ist. Hätten sie mal lieber eine Ausstellung gemacht, und wirklich was bewegt.Und wie die wieder angezogen waren - Puh.

Tut mir leid, dass ich nicht so gesittet war, aber ich bin ja auch nur eine anonyme jeunesse, einen herzlichen Dank trotzdem an alle für ihre Darlegungen und Positionierungserklärungen.

© 2017 THE THING Hamburg is member of international Thing Network: [Wien] [Frankfurt] [New York] [Berlin] [Rome] [Amsterdam]
I peruse this paragraph entirely regarding the resemblance of highest recent and before technologies, Cheap Nike Free Shoes I liked that a lot. Will there be a chapter two? cheap supras I pay a rapid visit day-to-day a few sites and information sites to peruse articles alternatively reviews, Babyliss Pro Perfect Curl reserve up posting such articles. Hollister Pas Cher accordingly right immediately I am likewise going apt add entire my movies at YouTube web site. Hollister France Hi, Chanel Espadrilles Yes I am also within hunt of Flash tutorials, babyliss pro perfect curl Wow! this cartoon type YouTube video I have viewed when I was amid basic level and at the present I am surrounded campus and seeing that over again at this district. www.hollisterparissoldes.fr The techniques mentioned surrounded this story in the near future addition vehicle by you own network site are genuinely fine thanks for such pleasant treatise. Cheap Louis Vuitton Handbagsif information are defined in sketches one can effortlessly be versed with these.